Rail traffic

Rail traffic has a long history in the Munich Metropolitan Region. The first rail link from Munich to Augsburg was opened as far back as 1837. Today, Munich – and, by extension, the entire surrounding region – is regarded as a vital node in the European rail network.

travelers a day at Munich's central railway station
450.000
travelers a day at Munich's central railway station
million passengers carried by Munich's local passenger transport utility
680
million passengers carried by Munich's local passenger transport utility
million passengers carried by Augsburg's local passenger transport utility
64
million passengers carried by Augsburg's local passenger transport utility

Two trans-European train lines – Berlin-Munich-Rome and Paris-Munich-Budapest – intersect in the Munich Metropolitan Region. The section of track from Munich via Ingolstadt to Nuremberg has already been upgraded to service high-speed trains at more than 300 km/h (around 190 mph). Further high-speed train lines bound for Stuttgart/Paris and Vienna/Budapest are currently in planning or under construction.

450,000 travelers a day put Munich's central station on a par with Hamburg as the biggest railway station in Germany.

The local public transport network, too, reaches far into the Munich Metropolitan Region, providing excellent mobility links. The local rail network extends more than 50 kilometers into the surrounding region and was voted the best local public transport system in Europe. In 2014, it carried nearly 680 million passengers. A second tunnel under Munich's city center will further increase regular train and commuter rail capacity. The Augsburg local public transport utility - the second-largest network in the Munich Metropolitan Region - carried 64 million people in 2014.

The region also serves as an important logistical hub for rail-borne goods traffic. The line in the direction of Switzerland's Gotthard Base Tunnel is likewise being ramped up to increase its capacity. When the Brenner Base Tunnel is completed in 2025, the opening of a second key rail link through the Alps will give the Munich Metropolitan Region a pivotal position in north-south goods traffic.